Ein Gedi Nature Reserve

Ein Gedi Nature Reserve

Ein Gedi is an oasis, located west of the Dead Sea, near Masada and the caves of Qumran. In Joshua 15:62, Ein Gedi is enumerated among the cities of the Tribe of Juda in the  Judea desert.
The indigenous Jewish town of Ein Gedi was an important source of balsam for the Greco-Roman world until its destruction by Byzantine emperor Justinia as part of his persecution of the Jews in his realm. A synagogue mosaic remains from Ein Gedi’s heyday, including a Judeo-Aramaic inscription warning inhabitants against “revealing the town’s secret” – possibly the methods for extraction and preparation of the much-prized balsam resin, though not stated outright in the inscription – to the outside world.
Ein Gedi nature reserve was declared in 1971 and is one of the most important reserves in Israel. The park is situated on the eastern border of the Judean Desert, on the Dead Sea coast. This nature reserve includes two spring-fed streams with flowing water year-round: Nahal David and Nahal Arugot. Two other springs, the Shulamit and Ein Gedi springs, also flow in the reserve. Together, the springs generate approximately three million cubic meters of water per year. Much of the water is used for agriculture or is bottled for consumption.
The reserve is a sanctuary for many types of plant, bird and animal species. The vegetation includes plants and trees from the tropical, desert, Mediterranean, and steppian regions, such as Sodom apple, acacia, jujube, and poplar. The many species of resident birds are supplemented by over 200 additional species during the migration periods in the spring and fall. Mammal species include the ibex and the hyrax.
The Ein Gedi national park features several archaeological sites including the Chalcolithic Temple of Ein Gedi and a first century CE village.
A kilometer from the nature reserve located Kibbutz Ein Gedi, founded in 1956. The Kibbutz offers various tourist attractions and takes advantage of the local weather patterns and the abundance of natural water to cultivate out-of-season produce. The kibbutz area contains an internationally acclaimed botanical garden covering an area of 100 dunams, There one can find more than 900 species of plants from all over the world.

Ein Gedi Nature Reserve

Opening Hours:
The best seasons:Spring, winter, autumn. Summer 8:00-17:00 Winter 8:00 – 16:00 On Fridays and holiday eves: 8:00 – 15:00 During the Winter:Last entry is possible Nahal David until 15:00.

Price: 27 NIS per adult, 14 NIS per child.
Location: On Highway 90 (Sea) about one kilometer north of Kibbutz Ein Gedi.
Phone: 972-8-6584285

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